web analytics

Ham House – a step back in time

WP Greet Box icon
Hello there! If you are new here, you might want to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow me on Twitter or like me on Facebook for the latest updates.

22 June 2010

With the temperature soaring, there is no escape from the sweltering heat even if you are indoor. Today we find ourselves in Ham House along River Thames and in the company of very warm and very forthcoming room wardens. The weather must have played a part in this hospitality. Having visited many National Trust properties, I can say coming across such friendly room wardens is a rarity and that makes our visit both an enriching and enjoyable one.

The Ham House we see today is due to the work done by William Murray and his eldest daughter Elizabeth. In 1626, William moved to Ham House and was close friends with the king, Charles I. With the king’s patronage, he furnished the house luxuriously. In the 1670s, Elizabeth created stunning interiors of which much had survived and remained unchanged. I marveled at the numerous intricate cabinets including a most unusual one which is entirely veneered with thick ivory. In the library, there are a couple of really old globes with a very different world map that we know today. The reason is there are still places not yet charted by men, for example the Western side of America. Splendid portraits adorn the four walls and even the ceilings are sometimes decorated with paintings of classical themes.

Globe Nomads review ratings: 4/5
We learned a lot from the room wardens and had a most enjoyable visit.
(please refer to ratings explanation)

Visitor Information:
National Trust property
Admission. House and Garden: adult £9.45, child £5.25, family £24.15. Garden only: adult £3.15, child £2.10, family £8.40. NT members free.
Parking free.
Please refer to National Trust for latest updates.


View Globe Nomads Travel Blog in a larger map

Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House entrance
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House ticketing van

The ticketing reception van.

Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House, statue of Father Thames

Statue of Father Thames, according to Wikipedia.

Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House outdoor wall bust
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House reception hall
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House wall portraits
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House grand staircase, fruit decoration

Decorations on the grand staircase built by William Murray.

Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House wall painting
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House ivory cabinet

This cabinet is entirely veneered with ivory. Ivory is molded with heat to create the wavy effect.

Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House room interior
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House ceiling painting
ass="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;">Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House jib door

Notice the jib door in the corner.

Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House back

The back of Ham House.

Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House plats
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House Cherry Garden

The Cherry Garden.

Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House Cherry Garden
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House Cherry Garden
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House Cherry Garden
Travel, Attraction review, United Kingdom, Ham House diary, cast iron cow legs

Cast iron “cow legs” table in the diary.

Related Posts with Thumbnails
This entry was posted in Destinations and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

2 Comments

  1. Posted July 21, 2010 at 2:19 pm | Permalink

    Leng,
    Old world architecture has always been a favorite of mine and you've done a great job on this report about the Ham House. I wasn't familiar with it, but happy to have learned about such a beautiful estate. I adored the knot garden especially.

    Renee

  2. Posted July 23, 2010 at 1:15 am | Permalink

    Renee,

    Thanks for dropping by! UK has many beautiful and well conserved estates throughout the country.

    Leng

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

*